Scientists to provide an update on the search for gravitational waves

Invitation to Connect in Streaming to the LIGO-Virgo Press Conference and to a First Follow-up Discussion.

11 febbraio 2016
Versione stampabile

At 16:30
Venue: Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico “Fabio Ferrari” – room A103

Scientists to provide an update on the search for gravitational waves

Invitation to Connect in Streaming to the LIGO-Virgo Press Conference and to a First Follow-up Discussion.

100 years after Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves, the European Gravitational Observatory (EGO) and the VIRGO Collaboration run a press conference to update on efforts by the VIRGO-LIGO scientific collaborations towards the first detection. A simultaneous press conference is run by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration in Washington, D.C. in the USA.
You are invited to connect remotely to the press conference and have a first informal discussion on the results that will be presented, together with the PhD students in Physics who contributed to the data analysis of the Advanced LIGO detectors. The event will be chaired by Rita Dolesi and Bruno Giacomazzo.

Scientific Coordinator: Giovanni A. Prodi, on behalf of the Virgo Group

The Virgo interferometer is a 3 km interferometer installed at Cascina, near Pisa, and the Virgo research is carried out by the VIRGO Collaboration, consisting of more than 250 physicists and engineers belonging to 19 different European research groups: 6 from Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in France; 8 from the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) in Italy; 2 in the Netherlands with Nikhef; the Wigner Institute in Hungary; the POLGRAW group in Poland and the European Gravitational Observatory (EGO).
LIGO, a system of two identical detectors, was conceived and built by MIT and Caltech researchers and funded by the National Science Foundation in the United States, with significant contributions from other U.S. and international partners. The twin detectors are located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. The research and the analysis of the data from all detectors are carried out jointly by a global group of scientists, including the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the VIRGO Collaboration.